How to Build Trust With Coworkers Using StrengthsFinder

How to Build Trust With Coworkers Using StrengthsFinder

Someone once said, “Trust is like oxygen – you only notice it when it’s not there.” It’s almost like an invisible foundation, where without it, everything falls apart. The problem with trust is it’s often hard to understand. It’s like it’s there or it’s not. But, what if it’s actually not all that ambiguous? What if there is more of a science to trust than we know to explore? If we spend so much time learning about our Strengths and how to have Tough Conversations, where does Trust come into play if it’s so important? Let’s start with Strengths. At Trybal, we’re huge fans of StrengthsFinder. If you’ve worked with us, we’ve likely taken you and the folks at your organization through a StrengthsFinder workshop and some one-on-one coaching. What tends to be pretty fun for people is when we reveal the concept of Dark Side Labels with our infamous Darth Vader slide on our PowerPoint deck. We teach people that everyone has Dark Sides and that we can talk about them with levity. Rather than attacking who someone is in their identity, we explain that the flip-side of the coin of what’s truly extraordinary about you is where you find your Dark Sides. Now, when it comes to trust, someone’s common Dark Sides or simple lack of Strength in a certain area may negatively impact any of the four cores of trust, as defined by Stephen M. R. Covey in his best-selling book, The Speed of Trust. The four cores are: Integrity Intent Capabilities, and Results If your Adaptability Strength has you go with the flow a little...
How to Build a Coaching Culture: Building Block Two

How to Build a Coaching Culture: Building Block Two

Originally posted on HCI.org After learning who to assess, and how to assess, the potential impact of a coaching model that supports the business, as discussed in Building Block 1, managers must take another step: uncover the best way to create the infrastructure to roll out the coaching program, including how to gather the right stakeholders and communicate the plan. Stakeholders: Identification and Enlistment Stakeholders are the leaders who are the direct and indirect beneficiaries of the coaching program. They will help with influencing and enlisting those within their reach, and they’ll set the appropriate metrics to measure the program’s success. As assessment of the coaching model is the first step in identifying potential stakeholders, some key stakeholders will simply shine due to their alignment with the business goals toward which the coaching program is aimed. Other leaders can and may step in as stakeholders for various reasons; some of the most common are demonstrated coaching competencies, mentor program integration and stretch assignments for emerging leaders. Some key things to keep in mind when confirming your stakeholder lineup are: Create room for stakeholders to execute their additional responsibilities Enable stakeholders to remove barriers as they show up Avoid appointing anyone who is not performing or exceeding expectations in their current role The investment in a coaching program is a long-running game, so it’s important to ensure long-term alignment with the stakeholders. Creating an onboarding and offboarding process for all stakeholders will be imperative to that leader in enlisting their team and managing the metrics put in place. Multi-phase Coaching Infrastructure: Coaching Philosophy: Framework Coaching Strategy: Assessment Coaching Infrastructure: Stakeholders/Roles and...
[Lucrative Lookback] How Team Dysfunction Hurts Your Bottom Line & Our Free Cost Calculator

[Lucrative Lookback] How Team Dysfunction Hurts Your Bottom Line & Our Free Cost Calculator

We already know the Cost of Avoidance is $1,500 & and 8 hour workday for every conflict we avoid, which, for an organization of 250, costs a minimum of $200,000! If you thought that was steep, get ready in this week’s Lucrative Lookback to see the baseline cost of dysfunctional teams. I’ll give you a second to take a deep breath and really get comfortable. We’re heading into 7 figures here, folks! Down to the business of team dysfunction. Raise your hand if you’ve ever been on a dysfunctional team, or have witnessed one first hand. Now, raise your hand if you thought that was/looked like fun! No one? *Cue Sarcasm* How odd! In all seriousness, dysfunctional teams are the bane of every stakeholder’s existence. They look bad, they feel worse and their performance is even more dismal than that…if you even want to call what they are doing performance. This infographic sums up the baseline financial cost of dysfunctional teams in an organization of 250 people: That number is a bit sobering, especially considering this is not a large organization! Keep in mind, this is only the baseline financial cost. It doesn’t even include the estimated $200,000 from conflict avoidance! Other detriments that aren’t calculated above include: Lack of trust & safety High levels of disengaged employees Wasted time gossiping, avoiding conflict etc. High turnover Knowledge gaps Lost faith in leadership Poor internal mobilization Missed opportunities Absenteeism Inefficiency Low morale Stress/health problems Poor teamwork Calculate your costs. Infographics are great, but sometimes it’s hard to find them relatable. Perhaps you’re in an organization larger or smaller than 250....
Do you really know your team, or are you just pretending?

Do you really know your team, or are you just pretending?

Think you know your work place team? Are you the person that reads a name tag every time you see them and look foolish calling them Christopher when the rest of the office knows them as CJ? What is their educational and professional background? When was the last time you even thought about it? Perhaps at their interview 2 years ago while holding their resume? Were you even the person that interviewed them? Where do they see themselves in 1, 3, and 5 years? How can you help them achieve their goals? When was the last time you even got close to this discussion? Annual performance review when they are more focused on whether or not they are getting a raise which may impact the way they answer? At a quick glance, most will probably think they have these covered.  Sort of a “duh!” moment.  I challenge you! How do you know? How would you know? Have you actually asked, or just assumed? Interesting stat for discussion. 70% of employees say their employer should understand them to the same degree they are expected to understand customers (Towers Watson). Companies spend billions on sales, marketing, research, travel, and every form of communication in between to understand and make a connection with customers, yet it’s not uncommon to work with a team of employees who rarely see or hear from their boss aside from instruction on the next assignment. Sure, most companies do a generic employee engagement survey and work to glean information from responses of 3.5 average on a 1-5 scale for “I feel valued at work” and a 2.7...
5 Ways StrengthsFinder Will Transform Your Team

5 Ways StrengthsFinder Will Transform Your Team

If you’ve been following our blog for a while, you probably know what StrengthsFinder is and perhaps have even benefited from it. If you’re new to our Tryb, StrengthsFinder is an assessment created by the Gallup Organization which helps you identify your Top 5 Strengths out of a potential 34. Your Strengths are natural patterns of thinking, feeling or behaving you possess that can be productively applied. They interact with each other to create a unique blend. There’s actually only a 1 in 33 milliion chance that someone has the same Top 5 Strengths as you in the same order. Your Strengths have a dark side, which is the part a lot of people love learning about. Your Strengths also influence your particular Leadership Style. And, most important, knowing your Strengths and the Strengths of your teammates can transform how you work together. In fact, here are 5 ways StrengthsFinder will transform your team: 1. It creates safety.  It’s not always easy to talk to people in a constructive manner about what they’re doing if it isn’t benefitting the team. If you bring it up, they often take it personally and feel offended, so you may just try to deal with it. StrengthsFinder dissolves a lot of this. When everyone on your team takes the assessment, they learn about the dark sides of their Strengths and how to Sophisticate them (in other words, express the light side more often than the dark side). It becomes common knowledge that everyone has dark sides, and that it’s totally normal. Once people realize they don’t have to hide their weaknesses, that their weaknesses are most...
How Leaders Can Encourage Accountability With Clear Communication

How Leaders Can Encourage Accountability With Clear Communication

As orginally posted on HCI.org It is not that I’m so smart. But I stay with the questions much longer. -Albert Einstein Revisiting unfortunate truth of leadership.  In part one and two of our Lead to Win series, we discussed how leaders often unknowingly make the shift from playing to win, to playing not to lose. Typically, four important aspects of successful leadership are impacted: Innovation, Change, Communication, Sustainability Last time we discussed how a scarcity mentality stunts authentic innovation and change, essentially crippling an organization over time. Today, we will focus on how playing not to lose affects communication. We’ll wrap up with sustainability in part four. Understanding your mental models. Your experiences and your interpretation of those experiences slowly and subtly lead to beliefs and assumptions, or mental models, that then drive your behavior.  Those mental models may be driving you to play not to lose instead of playing to win.  We will present some “playing not to lose” mental models, as well as their antithesis “playing to win”, mental models for your reflection in each of the four areas mentioned above. An example of playing not to lose. A key leader of an award winning healthcare company was struggling with what seemed a dip in accountability within his leadership team. Scores and measures that were usually reached were experiencing large dips. There had been several large initiatives that could help explain a dip, however, not for this long. When he asked his leaders what was happening, they repeatedly offered logical reasons for the dip. They continued to share they knew what was wrong and they “had it”. The leader...