What a Strengths Guide is and How to Become One

What a Strengths Guide is and How to Become One

At Trybal, we believe being a leader means more than having a title and people reporting to you. In fact, we often encourage people without either of those things to show up as leaders in their own way, every day. Why? Because that’s how the real magic happens! By building on and sophisticating what you’re truly great at, you’ll be able to guide others to do the same. So, perhaps, what we’re really challenging people to show up as a guide, is someone who: Advises or shows others the way Helps someone find the answer inside themselves so they can form an opinion or make a decision What does a guide look like? Guides show the way for someone that allows for them to uncover and create their own unique experience. In relationship to Strengths (using the StrengthsFinder tool), you have the privilege of guiding a person or group through the discovery of themselves in relationship to the language and concepts the tool provides. Here are some key things to consider when embarking on the joyful journey for your own unfolding or that of others: Get Inspired One of the most common experiences one has when they are beginning their own Strengths Journey is one of inspiration. This unique possibility filled lens awakens the sleeping giant deep within. Many, once inspired, want to shout it from the roof top, share, empower and, in our case, guide others through their own amazing Strengths journey.  Know Thyself As in all things, some level of mastery is helpful before having others seek your counsel or support. The journey to dig deep into your Strengths is priority...
[Lucrative Lookback] What a Bad Experience at the Hairdresser Taught Me About Leadership & Life

[Lucrative Lookback] What a Bad Experience at the Hairdresser Taught Me About Leadership & Life

 Are you making excuses about your current situation? In this week’s Lucrative Lookback, we’ll see how a bad experience at the salon translated into an opportunity to step into leadership using the principles for effectiveness. The Event. I was completely frantic. We were in Lebanon, where every woman gets her nails done twice a week and has her hair blown out on a dime, so we said yes to the first guy who offered a sweet deal to make us pretty before the wedding. They do this stuff in their sleep, we convinced ourselves. It doesn’t matter if his storefront appears questionable. But my hair ended up looking terrible and the wedding was in under two hours! “I did not travel thousands of miles and spend thousands of dollars to look like a hot mess at this wedding,” I stammered. I rushed out of the salon, attempting to survey my options but knowing I was in a state of emotional reaction, like that scene you read about in Emotional Intelligence when the shark is oncoming and you’re unable to make any sound decision. Not to mention, my head was two pounds heavier due to excessive pins and a questionable substance that may or may not have been hair gel. What am I going to do?!?!?! The Panic. I arrived back at our apartment, hoping not to bump into the bride - as if she needed to experience any of my frantic energy on her big day - and sought out advice on what I should do. The advice ended up coming from the bride anyway (which still amazes me)....
Do you really know your team, or are you just pretending?

Do you really know your team, or are you just pretending?

Think you know your work place team? Are you the person that reads a name tag every time you see them and look foolish calling them Christopher when the rest of the office knows them as CJ? What is their educational and professional background? When was the last time you even thought about it? Perhaps at their interview 2 years ago while holding their resume? Were you even the person that interviewed them? Where do they see themselves in 1, 3, and 5 years? How can you help them achieve their goals? When was the last time you even got close to this discussion? Annual performance review when they are more focused on whether or not they are getting a raise which may impact the way they answer? At a quick glance, most will probably think they have these covered.  Sort of a “duh!” moment.  I challenge you! How do you know? How would you know? Have you actually asked, or just assumed? Interesting stat for discussion. 70% of employees say their employer should understand them to the same degree they are expected to understand customers (Towers Watson). Companies spend billions on sales, marketing, research, travel, and every form of communication in between to understand and make a connection with customers, yet it’s not uncommon to work with a team of employees who rarely see or hear from their boss aside from instruction on the next assignment. Sure, most companies do a generic employee engagement survey and work to glean information from responses of 3.5 average on a 1-5 scale for “I feel valued at work” and a 2.7...
How Leaders Can Encourage Accountability With Clear Communication

How Leaders Can Encourage Accountability With Clear Communication

As orginally posted on HCI.org It is not that I’m so smart. But I stay with the questions much longer. -Albert Einstein Revisiting unfortunate truth of leadership.  In part one and two of our Lead to Win series, we discussed how leaders often unknowingly make the shift from playing to win, to playing not to lose. Typically, four important aspects of successful leadership are impacted: Innovation, Change, Communication, Sustainability Last time we discussed how a scarcity mentality stunts authentic innovation and change, essentially crippling an organization over time. Today, we will focus on how playing not to lose affects communication. We’ll wrap up with sustainability in part four. Understanding your mental models. Your experiences and your interpretation of those experiences slowly and subtly lead to beliefs and assumptions, or mental models, that then drive your behavior.  Those mental models may be driving you to play not to lose instead of playing to win.  We will present some “playing not to lose” mental models, as well as their antithesis “playing to win”, mental models for your reflection in each of the four areas mentioned above. An example of playing not to lose. A key leader of an award winning healthcare company was struggling with what seemed a dip in accountability within his leadership team. Scores and measures that were usually reached were experiencing large dips. There had been several large initiatives that could help explain a dip, however, not for this long. When he asked his leaders what was happening, they repeatedly offered logical reasons for the dip. They continued to share they knew what was wrong and they “had it”. The leader...
The First Step to Holding Someone Accountable

The First Step to Holding Someone Accountable

It’s probably happened to you before - someone makes a commitment to you and then they don’t do what they said they’d do. Uggggh! There you are, left feeling high and dry, wondering how to remedy the situation. How do you influence someone to be a person of their word? Accountability. It’s a magical and yet sometimes uncomfortable word. It’s the cultural trait we know will bring us to a place of high performance and, at the same time, something we don’t always want to act upon. Do I really have to call someone out? How do I actually do it in a way that preserves the relationship? It makes me think of a quote I recently read: “It’s easy to find a leader who creates warm and lasting relationships but who struggles to get things done. It’s not much harder to find a no-nonsense hard-hitting leader whom you might send in to put out a fire but who creates hard feelings. Consequently, when you find someone who can mange both people and production, you’ve got a real gem.” (Crucial Accountability) Some of us may shy away from holding others accountable for fear of ruining the relationship. In the end, we come off like a pushover. So, how do we find a middle ground? It’s not a snap-of-the-finger process, but there is always a first step. And here it is: The first step to holding someone accountable is getting clear on what you’re actually holding them accountable to. From the book, Crucial Accountability, there’s a simple acronym to help you remember: CPR. Content, Pattern, Relationship. Content  This is where you address what happened - the...
[Lucrative Lookback] How to Kill Death By Meeting With StrengthsFinder Methodology

[Lucrative Lookback] How to Kill Death By Meeting With StrengthsFinder Methodology

Our meetings Suck! “We meet about meetings to plan meetings.” “Here’s another wasted hour!” Sound familiar? In this week’s Lucrative Lookback, we’ll show you how to use the StrengthsFinder tool to optimize your meeting time and get results while you’re at it! Why are meetings a perpetual problem? There are a ton of books on the subject, communication courses, college classes, seminars, etc. Google the word “meeting” and you’ll get millions, yes MILLIONS, of hits. Yet, our meetings suck! Grrrrr!!! A Strengths-Based Culture offers opportunity for success. Consider your team’s strengths. Is the team balanced with Strategic Thinking, Relationship Building, Executing, and Influencing strengths? Does it need to be balanced? Reference the following table from Gallup: **********************Word of caution here! *************************** Strengths is a POSITIVE tool meant for use in a manner of sophistication and abundance. The objective is to allow people to flourish by doing what they do best. Combinations of various talents and sophistication of an individual’s understanding of the tool all play into application. Unsophisticated use shows up as labeling and stereotyping = NOT the correct use of the tool. The domain or specific talents that an individual displays don’t directly relate to the tasks that person does best or wants to do. Knowing this info does provide the opportunity to have a safe discussion with the individual about applying their talents to specific tasks. ***********Now that we’ve established this critical point, let’s continue!************** Now consider the case of a meeting to brainstorm new product design. Meeting objective: Brainstorm new product ideas Strategic thinkers can’t wait for this meeting and are ready to talk and discuss...