Why Outstanding Internal Customer Service is Powerful

Why Outstanding Internal Customer Service is Powerful

The Importance of Internal Customer Service Everyone who has ever had a job understands what customer service is and why it’s important. Great customer service keeps the cash flow up, and bad customer service interrupts it. But, who is your customer? If you’re not leading a “client facing” team, do you even have a customer? Most likely, the answer is yes. Despite the fact that you may or may not deal directly with the consumers of your product or service, you do deal directly with at least one other team or group. That “at least one other team” is, in fact, your customer. Identifying Your Customer If you don’t deal directly with the customers outside of the business, you deal with customers inside. You may be thinking, “Wait, if they’re inside the business, they aren’t really a customer. They’re a co-worker, right?” Sure they are, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t also a type of customer. If you consider that a customer is someone you provide a service to, then you have to include those customers whom you work with internally. For examples, if you work for the IT department, then you provide a service to anyone who uses technology within the company. Most likely, the vast majority of people at your place of work use a computer, printer, or phone. All of these people should be considered your team’s customer. A Brilliant Assist is Part of Making the Goal Imagine if any inquiry made of you or your team was treated as a customer request rather than an annoyance. In that case, you would make that request a priority, and...
Boost Engagement and Productivity with the Trybal Gratitude Journal

Boost Engagement and Productivity with the Trybal Gratitude Journal

We are excited to introduce the Trybal Gratitude Journal, authored by our founder Alexsys Thompson. We are the catalyst for the national gratitude movement and would love for you to take part. A gratitude practice has a direct impact on the wellness of you and your teams. Lexy is quoted in the Forbes article “14 Employee Well-Being Initiatives That Will Boost Engagement And Productivity” on this very topic. 12. A Gratitude Practice Gratitude in action. I have found that this practice yields a high level of awareness that may not have existed prior. Following awareness, actions begin to align with desired outcomes. The result is that gratitude turns into personal accountability. Move it into action so others can experience it, and organizationally, both mental and physical wellness are positively impacted. – Alexsys “Lexy” Thompson, Forbes.com We are donating 100% of the profits of the journals presales to Houston Charities for our recovery from Harvey. As a bonus Lexy is offering a 30 minute video for groups of 12 or more to get inspired to start their gratitude practice. Need a micro team building activity? Here it is! BUY THE...
How to Build a Coaching Culture: Building Block Two

How to Build a Coaching Culture: Building Block Two

Originally posted on HCI.org After learning who to assess, and how to assess, the potential impact of a coaching model that supports the business, as discussed in Building Block 1, managers must take another step: uncover the best way to create the infrastructure to roll out the coaching program, including how to gather the right stakeholders and communicate the plan. Stakeholders: Identification and Enlistment Stakeholders are the leaders who are the direct and indirect beneficiaries of the coaching program. They will help with influencing and enlisting those within their reach, and they’ll set the appropriate metrics to measure the program’s success. As assessment of the coaching model is the first step in identifying potential stakeholders, some key stakeholders will simply shine due to their alignment with the business goals toward which the coaching program is aimed. Other leaders can and may step in as stakeholders for various reasons; some of the most common are demonstrated coaching competencies, mentor program integration and stretch assignments for emerging leaders. Some key things to keep in mind when confirming your stakeholder lineup are: Create room for stakeholders to execute their additional responsibilities Enable stakeholders to remove barriers as they show up Avoid appointing anyone who is not performing or exceeding expectations in their current role The investment in a coaching program is a long-running game, so it’s important to ensure long-term alignment with the stakeholders. Creating an onboarding and offboarding process for all stakeholders will be imperative to that leader in enlisting their team and managing the metrics put in place. Multi-phase Coaching Infrastructure: Coaching Philosophy: Framework Coaching Strategy: Assessment Coaching Infrastructure: Stakeholders/Roles and...
5 Ways to Prevent Workplace Bullying

5 Ways to Prevent Workplace Bullying

Workplace bullying is more common than we think. Research by Dr. Judy Blando shows that almost 75% of the people she surveyed had experienced or witnessed it. So, what are we to do? Here are 5 things you can do today to create more awareness around workplace bullying and decrease its power in your workplace. 1) Know what bullying behavior ‘looks’ like. By being able to identify the traits of someone exhibiting bullying behavior, you can anticipate potential problems. Here are the general characteristics:     Seek disproportionate transfers from unit     Over-utilize time off, high absenteeism     Use a little bit of fear to motivate staff     Exclude others socially     Force staff to work ‘to specs’ and nothing more     Unaware of dissenting voices in work situations that need improvement     Feel that meetings are a waste of time 2) Know what someone being targeted looks like. By being able to identify those who may potentially be targeted for bullying, you can also anticipate potential problems. Considering the fact that those being bullied often don’t cry for help, you may be able to step in to make the difference. Here are the general characteristics: Independent More competent Well liked Ethical and honest Not political Believers in a benevolent world Cooperative collaborators 3) Create and/or clarify company values and behaviors. If you do not have clearly defined values and behaviors for your company, your cultures is not clear. By making clear what is okay and not okay, and having consequences for both, you will be less likely to see people exhibiting behavior that is toxic. 4) Create a Workplace Bullying Policy. If you create...
Hurricane Harvey: What We Can Learn From it and How to Help

Hurricane Harvey: What We Can Learn From it and How to Help

Our hearts go out to all of our friends, family, and clients in Texas who are coping with Hurricane Harvey, the event of a lifetime. Personally, I am very blessed to be in Georgetown, Texas with my family and with no negative impact. In the absence of being able to be on the ground or in a boat, we have donated to several great charities that are providing relief. See the links below if you feel moved to help from afar. Throughout this experience, I was reminded repeatedly that there is so much more that unites us than divides us. That our hearts and souls are the threads that bind us. The political nonsense and labeling on everyone’s social media stream are now gone. In their place are resources, love, and compassion. I find myself wondering how to be a part of maintaining this level of care, once the crisis has passed. The importance of clear communication has also been highlighted. When someone was asking for help in the over 2,000 rescues (as of writing this), they needed to be very clear on where they were so they could be located. With the many sources of support that were coming through, clarity of message was crucial for resources to be accessed. The Cajun Navy even had walkie talkie apps that were specific to them completing their job. There are even systems in place to check-in as “safe” so your loved ones can see you are okay, even when you may not be able to communicate directly. Early on, the lack of alignment between state and local government about whether...
Listen Up Leaders: How Body Language Plays a Crucial Role in Communication

Listen Up Leaders: How Body Language Plays a Crucial Role in Communication

Most people are aware that body language is a crucial part of communication. What most people take for granted is just how important it is to leadership. Yep, that’s right! The placement of your arms, your posture, even the way you cross your legs communicates something to your team members. Being aware of the way you present yourself to people could just give you the edge you’ve been searching for in your leadership and/or communication style. It almost seems unfair to give you one more thing to think about when you’re presenting or having a conversation. You have to make sure your dress is audience appropriate, you’re knowledgeable about what you’re saying, your word choice is intelligent, concise, and work appropriate, not to mention your presentation materials, and now you’re expected to pay attention to your body language? Yes, it’s a lot to ask, but you’re capable and can definitely handle it! So, let’s look into why this is such a vital part of leading. Establishing Your Presence If you’ve ever seen someone speak in front of a room, and immediately thought, “Wow, they must be important”, a huge part of that probably has something to do with their body language, specifically their power pose. A power pose is usually one that makes you appear large in your space. For example, a wide stance with your legs and large gestures with your arms make you look bigger by helping you occupy a larger space. This unconsciously gets people’s attention and records in their brain as “big and important”. Remember, all people have a limbic system, or “animal brain”, which subconsciously operates. It’s the same system that...