How to Build a Coaching Culture in Your Organization – Building Block One

How to Build a Coaching Culture in Your Organization – Building Block One

As originally posted on HCI.org. Written by Alexsys Thompson and Dr. Christina Barrs. Conduct an assessment to better understand how coaching may help your organization meet strategic goals. In our first post of this series, we started the conversation on developing a coaching culture in your organization. Today, we will explore building block one of three so we are able to forge a path toward this new reality. If you’ve gotten your leadership’s buy-in for the long haul, resources have been identified to help with administration, and you are excited to move into creating a coaching culture, the next step is to run an assessment to create clarity around the specific strategic goals you can impact and how. Let’s explore who to assess and how to assess the potential impact of a coaching model that supports the business. The ‘who’ of it all We already spoke to the importance of long-term leadership buy-in; they have nodded and given you the thumbs up. Now, which ones do you need to go to for help in assessing champions, stakeholders, and end users of a coaching approach? Champion/Sponsor: This is a leader that influences key areas where you’ll remove barriers or require the enlistment of others in the process. Stakeholders: This group of leaders will be the direct and indirect beneficiaries of the coaching work.  They will help with influencing within their reach, helping to enlist others and setting the appropriate metrics coaching will be aimed at. End Users: This group of people may include some stakeholders; however, few if it does. These are the people that will be learning and leveraging the coaching model. This...
The Difference Between Knowing Your Strengths & Using Them

The Difference Between Knowing Your Strengths & Using Them

Knowing Strengths. The other day, a client wrote to me to let me know, “I had my sister take the StrengthsFinder assessment! Guess what, we have three Strengths that are the same! We loved chatting about it, and after I hung up the phone with her it made me miss her even more.” She has also had her husband take the StrengthsFinder assessment and was thrilled by her discussion and learnings with him. This is what I call an enthusiast! Someone who experiences something they’ve seen impact their entire lives, so it only makes sense to them to share it with those who are important to them. Committing to Strengths. When we choose to be enthusiasts of StrengthsFinder, which is what we call Strengths Guides over here at Trybal, there are three significant contributions we’re deciding to make to the lives of those around us: 1. We’re choosing to see their Strengths.  A lot of times, we can sort of feel when someone is in the zone. We see they’re feeling good, that they’re being productive, and that those around them are being positively impacted. Most of the time, this is the combination of all their Strengths, synergizing in perfect harmony. When we choose to specifically discover someone’s Strengths, we can make sense of why certain moments are so empowering for them. We can peel back the layers, discover the intricacies, and create new moments that can also be very empowering for them. We’re intentional. 2. We’re figuring out how we work best together.  Not only does becoming very intentional about someone else’s Strengths serve them immensely, but figuring...
How to Stop Office Gossip Once and For All

How to Stop Office Gossip Once and For All

In the past ten years I’ve been a part of two teams: the first, the Canadian Women’s Water Polo Team, and the second, Trybal Performance. Since joining Trybal, it’s been a natural thing for me to compare what this team feels like versus what playing for Team Canada felt like. Not so much in the “jumping in the pool and throwing a water polo ball” sense, but more in the sense of team dynamics.  The main thing that sticks out to me is having a clear set of team values. As soon as Trybal was created, so were its values, and our founder has made sure we all know and live them. I have mine taped in my notebook. For example, I know I’m expected to Create Safety (value 2)  for my trybmates and express Kind Candor (value 3), which gives me a guideline for how to behave.  Not only does it guide my behaviour, but it gives me the place to hold someone accountable when they’re not living our values. So when I think of my experience with Team Canada, that was something that was missing. When you don’t have a clear system of accountability, the essential glue that holds the team together is missing. One of the things I remember being bothered by most was the presence of gossip. We spent so many hours together, which had us argue like sisters at times (expected), but since we didn’t have clearly defined values, the arguing like sisters would turn into gossipping. There were cliques, and it impacted our ability to be united and, therfore, performant. When you grow...
Why Most Training Sucks & How to Fix It

Why Most Training Sucks & How to Fix It

“Most training sucks. Yours didn’t.” That was the feedback I received after a recent 5-day leadership development program. It was one of my top 10 best compliments ever as it came from a strongly introverted engineer. He shared with me that he keeps getting “sent” to development programs. Within a few hours of any training, he takes phone calls, wanders the halls, and returns late after each break. I’ve been there, haven’t we all? I have sat through my fair share of less than titillating industry conference sessions, quarterly meetings, and annual “rah-rah” events. In each of these cases, the underlying goal is to develop us in some way. But what makes for a great development experience whether it is a formal training or a weekly meeting? Before you start throwing tomatoes my way, a great meeting or development experience goes far beyond “brilliant skills” as a facilitator. There are things like a proper training design, strong content, the pacing of material, and how audience members impact the environment. That said, there are some tricks of the trade that can help with your next presentation or meeting: Experiential Learning Less telling, more asking Stories Applying the tricks. Let’s say your boss is frustrated that all meetings start 15 minutes after they are actually supposed to start. How might you use experiential learning, less telling more asking, and stories to help “solve” the punctuality issue? Let your audience or meeting attendees experience what it is you are trying to get across. In the case of the punctuality issue, make sure every one knows what time a meeting is to start...