The Difference Between Knowing Your Strengths & Using Them

The Difference Between Knowing Your Strengths & Using Them

Knowing Strengths. The other day, a client wrote to me to let me know, “I had my sister take the StrengthsFinder assessment! Guess what, we have three Strengths that are the same! We loved chatting about it, and after I hung up the phone with her it made me miss her even more.” She has also had her husband take the StrengthsFinder assessment and was thrilled by her discussion and learnings with him. This is what I call an enthusiast! Someone who experiences something they’ve seen impact their entire lives, so it only makes sense to them to share it with those who are important to them. Committing to Strengths. When we choose to be enthusiasts of StrengthsFinder, which is what we call Strengths Guides over here at Trybal, there are three significant contributions we’re deciding to make to the lives of those around us: 1. We’re choosing to see their Strengths.  A lot of times, we can sort of feel when someone is in the zone. We see they’re feeling good, that they’re being productive, and that those around them are being positively impacted. Most of the time, this is the combination of all their Strengths, synergizing in perfect harmony. When we choose to specifically discover someone’s Strengths, we can make sense of why certain moments are so empowering for them. We can peel back the layers, discover the intricacies, and create new moments that can also be very empowering for them. We’re intentional. 2. We’re figuring out how we work best together.  Not only does becoming very intentional about someone else’s Strengths serve them immensely, but figuring...
How to Break the Cycle of Distrust on Your Team

How to Break the Cycle of Distrust on Your Team

Trust in the workplace is an interesting topic.  Trust starts with communication, specifically with the ability to handle Tough Conversations. Tough Conversations are those involving anything that makes us uncomfortable, sparks emotions, requires vulnerability, etc.  For example: questioning your boss discussing performance issues asking for a raise proposing a major process change correcting a coworker, or asking for clarification on how anonymity is maintained on employee surveys The less a team is willing to step into these Tough Conversations, the more space they leave for stories about the motives of others.  The more the stories grow, the more trust shrinks and before long, voilà! The cycle of doom takes hold. Consider the annual employee survey when trust is missing: In this cycle: Employees feel management doesn’t care, doesn’t listen, and does whatever they want regardless of employee input.  The perspective on feedback is that it’s a waste of time and makes the person offering it a target. Management feels employees are disengaged and not aligned to organizational objectives.  The perspective becomes a need to micromanage and control versus empower and grow. Solution: Avoid or break the cycle of distrust and learn to handle your team’s Tough Conversations. Tough Conversations are complex and unfortunately not something covered in grade school or college.  We get very little training on how to handle them effectively with candor and skill.  Most people just wing it. Here’s some tips on how to begin: Accept that everyone is different. We all bring different Strengths, blind spots, experiences, and knowledge. Avoid blame. It’s judgement and doesn’t move conversation forward. Be curious. Seek understanding. Clarify intent, yours...
3 Steps to Get Your Communication Back on Track

3 Steps to Get Your Communication Back on Track

Any of the following familiar? You feel more like you’re talking at the team instead of with the team. The team complains about communication. Not enough of the right and too much of the wrong. You get 100+ emails a day, they never stop and the only thing you have to show for it is increased anxiety and frustration You over-communicate initiatives, goals, and updates with minimal results Seek first to understand, then to be understood. – Stephen Covey Try the following 3 steps: #1 Know Thyself. We each have our own unique filter for how we see, hear, and understand the world.  Genetics, talents, experience, education, situation, and motivation are unique for each of us.  At Trybal Performance, we utilize the StrengthsFinder tool to help individuals define and understand their filters for the world around them.  Regardless of the tool you use, find something to help you gain insight into you.  Ask for feedback from those around you.  Reflect on when your communication was most successful and least successful.  Get curious and seek to understand you. #2 Know Thy Team Make it a point to understand the individuals on your team and help them understand you.  Often, we assume our filter is right and everyone else should have the same.  Based on those assumptions we communicate with little serious thought to how those around us receive and process the information we’re delivering.  We also don’t clearly help those around us understand how we see, hear, and understand what they’re sending our way.  Openly discuss and evaluate team communication.  What works and what doesn’t?  Get curious and seek to...