How to Build a Coaching Culture: Building Block Two

How to Build a Coaching Culture: Building Block Two

Originally posted on HCI.org After learning who to assess, and how to assess, the potential impact of a coaching model that supports the business, as discussed in Building Block 1, managers must take another step: uncover the best way to create the infrastructure to roll out the coaching program, including how to gather the right stakeholders and communicate the plan. Stakeholders: Identification and Enlistment Stakeholders are the leaders who are the direct and indirect beneficiaries of the coaching program. They will help with influencing and enlisting those within their reach, and they’ll set the appropriate metrics to measure the program’s success. As assessment of the coaching model is the first step in identifying potential stakeholders, some key stakeholders will simply shine due to their alignment with the business goals toward which the coaching program is aimed. Other leaders can and may step in as stakeholders for various reasons; some of the most common are demonstrated coaching competencies, mentor program integration and stretch assignments for emerging leaders. Some key things to keep in mind when confirming your stakeholder lineup are: Create room for stakeholders to execute their additional responsibilities Enable stakeholders to remove barriers as they show up Avoid appointing anyone who is not performing or exceeding expectations in their current role The investment in a coaching program is a long-running game, so it’s important to ensure long-term alignment with the stakeholders. Creating an onboarding and offboarding process for all stakeholders will be imperative to that leader in enlisting their team and managing the metrics put in place. Multi-phase Coaching Infrastructure: Coaching Philosophy: Framework Coaching Strategy: Assessment Coaching Infrastructure: Stakeholders/Roles and...
Does going to work feel like a drama fest?

Does going to work feel like a drama fest?

Teamwork feel more like team-drama? Most of us know what it feels like to be on a team that feels more like a high school locker room than a professional workplace. If you look back on those experiences, you probably feel certain of who or what the problem was. Here’s the problem with that: we don’t often know things, we usually assume them. Our perspectives are stories.  Our stories are missed opportunity. However, when we look at our teams through StrengthsFinder and choose to get curious (instead of judgmental), we can transform our workplaces from a drama fest to a professional, goal-oriented workplace. In other words, you can unleash the vibe of your Tryb! Take our friend, Tracy, for example. Here’s a snapshot of a typical day at work for her: Tracy walked slowly down the hall, rarely making eye contact, checking her phone. Tracy rarely engaged people around the office in small talk except for a couple of her peers. Amongst the staff, the general opinion was that Tracy didn’t care, was arrogant and had her favorite clique. You were either in or you were out. Most felt they were out. As Tracy walked through the building she felt people were avoiding her. She noticed Shara look up, frown, and stare at her computer. Across the room, Thomas was shuffling papers on a desk that looked like it should be on the tv show about hoarders. As she neared Marcus’s desk, she could hear a lively discussion taking place until they noticed her, at which point they abruptly halted the conversation and moved on. As she reached the conference room, Tracy...
5 Ways to Prevent Workplace Bullying

5 Ways to Prevent Workplace Bullying

Workplace bullying is more common than we think. Research by Dr. Judy Blando shows that almost 75% of the people she surveyed had experienced or witnessed it. So, what are we to do? Here are 5 things you can do today to create more awareness around workplace bullying and decrease its power in your workplace. 1) Know what bullying behavior ‘looks’ like. By being able to identify the traits of someone exhibiting bullying behavior, you can anticipate potential problems. Here are the general characteristics:     Seek disproportionate transfers from unit     Over-utilize time off, high absenteeism     Use a little bit of fear to motivate staff     Exclude others socially     Force staff to work ‘to specs’ and nothing more     Unaware of dissenting voices in work situations that need improvement     Feel that meetings are a waste of time 2) Know what someone being targeted looks like. By being able to identify those who may potentially be targeted for bullying, you can also anticipate potential problems. Considering the fact that those being bullied often don’t cry for help, you may be able to step in to make the difference. Here are the general characteristics: Independent More competent Well liked Ethical and honest Not political Believers in a benevolent world Cooperative collaborators 3) Create and/or clarify company values and behaviors. If you do not have clearly defined values and behaviors for your company, your cultures is not clear. By making clear what is okay and not okay, and having consequences for both, you will be less likely to see people exhibiting behavior that is toxic. 4) Create a Workplace Bullying Policy. If you create...