How a Bunch of 8-year-olds Taught Me the Truth About Goal-Setting

How a Bunch of 8-year-olds Taught Me the Truth About Goal-Setting

In soccer, the objective is to get the ball in the goal, a big white rectangle standing prominently at the end of the field, obvious and highly visible. As the coach of my son’s soccer team, I made sure everyone was clear.  We talked about kicking goals. We practiced kicking goals. We talked about kicking around the goalkeeper.  We were ready! In organizations, there’s a mission and/or value statement along with major annual and quarterly goals used as a barometer for goal-setting.  These are usually posted on walls, letters, signs, screen backgrounds, webpages, etc. – obvious to the employees. Easy as pie! The mission, values, and major goals are communicated in emails, speeches, posters, etc. No excuses for not knowing. Everybody’s supposed to be clear. Pie…right? Wrong. When goal-setting doesn’t work. Well, game time and the whistle blows. The players begin running in a mob around the ball. They steal from their teammates, kids are falling, looking confused, disengaging and getting upset. Parents are yelling from the sideline. The other team is stealing the ball and scoring with ease. We’re not even close to our goal!  It’s chaos!  Sound familiar? Think about it next time you’re watching the news or observing your own organization. There’s many stories of failure to meet goals.  Employees are frustrated, disengaged and leaving. Stock holders are selling. Customers are shopping elsewhere.  In schools, parents are mad and kids are failing. What happened? The goal is clear! In the case of our team, kick the ball in the goal and score points.  In business it’s something like increase sales 20% or reduce injuries 10%.  In...
[Lucrative Lookback] How to Create a Team Culture of Accountability

[Lucrative Lookback] How to Create a Team Culture of Accountability

Most of us have good intentions when we take on a task or agree to a deadline, there may just be a few pieces missing that make it easy to drop the ball. In this week’s Lucrative Lookback, we’ll dive into exactly what it takes to create a team where people show up and do what they say they’ll do. Imagine a world with more of that! There are two types of team experiences. We’ve all been on teams where one or two people were less than reliable. Regardless of individual performance, it seems almost inevitable that, for some teams, things just won’t get done on time. On the flip side, most of us have been on teams that have all their ducks in a row. Things are smooth, people get their stuff done, and conflict is at a minimum. What is it about these experiences that make them so much more effective? Team cultures of accountability are the game changer. Team accountability. In most cases, a team culture of accountability isn’t something we recognize purposefully. It’s something we often attribute to character, if we acknowledge it at all. By that, I mean we think a team is “good” because the organization it’s apart of is just a great company, or because the people in the group have great work ethics. Both of those things may be true, there is just way more to it than we consciously realize. It’s important to understand exactly how to create team cultures of accountability so the experience is repeatable, on purpose. Everything Trybal practices and preaches begins and ends with that idea:...
How To Talk To People Better

How To Talk To People Better

You probably remember a conversation you’ve had where someone said something harsh to you and then justified it by pleading, “I’m just being honest!” It’s like they were saying, “I’m just being a good person, in the service of Honesty, so if it hurts you, it’s not my problem.” Perhaps they think you’ll take less offense because they’re attempting to embody a noble characteristic, but most of the time that isn’t the case. In fact, if you’re like me, any time someone says, “I’m just being honest!” after saying something harsh, I take double the offense. Why is that? Well, the reason those “just being honest” people bother us so much is because they’re only taking responsibility for what they think is a noble intention and not taking responsibility for the impact of what they’ve said on us. They’re over there on their side of the conversation in their white gloves, meanwhile we’re feeling hurt. So what do we do? In the New York Times Business Bestseller, Difficult Conversations, the answer is to disentangle intention from impact. It says, “Intentions strongly influence our judgments of others: If someone intended to hurt us, we judge them more harshly than if they hurt us by mistake. We’re willing to be inconvenienced by someone if they have a good reason, we’re irritated if we think they just don’t care about the impact of their actions on us.” In the the case of someone who keeps pulling the “just being honest” card, here are five steps to assure that when you talk to others, you can leave the conversation with more understanding on both sides: 1....
How to Hire the Right Fit for Your Team

How to Hire the Right Fit for Your Team

Hiring a new team member can be a tricky business. Obviously, you want to hire someone who can do the job at hand. More importantly, and perhaps more overlooked, you also want to hire someone who adds value to the team dynamic and the organization’s mission. That’s one daunting task! And it’s one that many people don’t understand the true impact of. Trybal Performance was built with the intention to thrive, so it goes without saying that we take great pride in finding and attracting unique and dynamic members. Each member of our small but mighty Tryb has an energy all their own and a fulfilling passion they bring to the table. It ensures we have a continuous stream of creativity that comes through in what we do.   Given our Strengths-based approach to team building, people often ask us how to build their own tribe. We recently had the pleasure of adding a new member to ours, so we thought now would be a great time to answer that question. His name is Matt Swenson, and he can tell you, we didn’t make it easy on him!  There was one critical piece of the puzzle we had to get right: cultural fit. Our core Trybal values had to be front and center when considering his position, because how he executes is only half of the equation. The other half has to come from his strongly-aligned and inherent values. That’s right; his actual skill–set played second fiddle to cultural fit.   Based on our values, we had to ask Matt and ourselves:  Was his mindset founded in abundance and...
[Lucrative Lookback] How to Leverage Your Team’s Strengths in the Workplace

[Lucrative Lookback] How to Leverage Your Team’s Strengths in the Workplace

We all have those little things we don’t enjoy doing. They’re usually the things we stuff to the bottom of our to-do list. For some, it’s expense reports, for others it’s making a powerpoint to show to the boss. Think about whatever those pesky little tasks are for you; I bet you can come up with a handful. In this Lucrative Lookback, we’ll see how leveraging the strengths of your teammates can help you eliminate some of those pesky little tasks. In fact, what would life be like if you could eliminate at least half of them from your life? Sounds pretty sweet, doesn’t it?! It’s possible to make this a reality when you learn to leverage your team’s Strengths! Let’s see it in action. Boss: “I’ve had it with this “bleeping” car! “ Me: “What? What’s wrong?” Boss: “I’m supposed to pick up our two most valuable clients and it’s making loud grinding noises and won’t accelerate!” Me: “OK. Are you alright? Do I need to come get you?” Boss: “I’m pissed! This damn thing won’t go over 20 mph, the engine is revved but won’t shift into upper gears, and when I come to a complete stop the engine dies. Now I’m coasting to every stop light in hopes of not actually having to stop!” The company car was several years old and based on the description from my boss, Christine, I figured the transmission was shot. Long story short, the mechanic said the repairs were more than the car was worth. So, Christine says, “This car is a piece of shit! You can squash it flat...
Lucrative Lookback: 3 Ways You Can Actually Build Accountability at Work

Lucrative Lookback: 3 Ways You Can Actually Build Accountability at Work

We know a lack of accountability can cause poor customer service, create team dysfunction and become a huge issue for leadership. But, now that we’re aware, how can we do something about it? In this month’s Lucrative Lookback, we’ll revisit 3 simple things we can be mindful of to start creating accountability at work! When I stopped at the first summit on the mountainous journey to redesign my life, I reflected on how far I’d come. Though only a quarter of the way towards my 200lb weight loss, I wanted to examine my process and lessons learned. I realized that my past was dotted with many failed attempts at healthier living, but this time, my changes were finally starting to stick. It made me wonder, “What was the game-changer?” I immediately thought of my dietitian. Our bi-weekly sessions kept me honest with myself (and her) about the impact of my food and lifestyle choices. Simply put, I was accountable to someone other than myself for the changes I was trying to make. I realized I was onto something, so I immediately wanted to know more. Webster’s defines accountability as an obligation or willingness to accept responsibility; or, to account for one’s actions.  Let’s dig into that… •    Obligation or willingness – choice•    Accept responsibility – commitment•    Account for one’s actions – awareness Choice. Commitment. Awareness. The essence of accountability is simple: it starts with us and continues when we pass our choices, commitment and awareness to another. In doing so, we invite them to join us on our journey - proverbial passengers on our drive to a better existence....